Chesterton Tribune

 

 

Jobless rate in the state region and locally mostly stable

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By KEVIN NEVERS

Indiana’s seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate held steady in May at 5.7 percent, mainly due to approximately 2,000 unemployed Hoosiers returning to the labor force to look for work, the Indiana Department of Workforce Development (DWD) said today.

Still, the state’s jobless rate remains more than half a point below the national rate, DWD reported. “Indiana’s labor force gains continue to outpace the national rate, as the Hoosier labor force has grown by more than 46,000 over the past year, while U.S. increases have been minimal.”

Indiana added 4,800 private sector jobs in May. Since July of 2009, the low point of employment in the state, Indiana has added nearly 223,000 private sector jobs.

“The Hoosier labor force has grown significantly for the past eight months in a row,” DWD Commissioner Scott Sanders said. “This is not the case with some of our neighboring states who have experienced unemployment rate declines due to decreases in their labor force. It is clear that Hoosiers are going back to work and that good jobs are available.”

Sanders also noted that claims for state unemployment insurance in May were more than 10,000 below May 2013 levels. Initial claims and continued claims remain at levels not seen since 2000, DWD said.

Sectors showing gains in May include private educational and health services (+2,100); professional and business services (+1,000); leisure and hospitality (+800); construction (+800); and manufacturing (+300).

Sectors showing declines in May include trade, transportation and utilities (-1,100); and financial activities (-700).

Total non-farm employment increased in May (+5,000).

Regionally, Locally

In Porter County the seasonally unadjusted jobless rate in May rose to 6.3 percent, from 6.1 percent in April (7.3 percent in May 2013). Throughout Porter County 5,433 people were looking for work in May, an increase of 5.4 percent over April (a decrease of 12 percent since May 2013).

In Lake County the unemployment rate in May was steady at 7.7 percent, the same as in April (9.0 percent in May 2013). In LaPorte County the unemployment rate in May was similarly steady, at 7.3 percent, the same as in April (9.4 percent in May 2013).

In Chesterton the unemployment rate in May rose marginally, to 5.7 percent from 5.6 percent n April (6.6 percent in May 2013). A total of 404 people was looking for work in May, an increase of 4.4 percent over April (a decrease of 11.6 percent since May 2013).

In Valparaiso the unemployment rate in May increased to 5.3 percent, from 5.2 percent in April (6.7 percent in May 2013). A total of 881 people was looking for work in May, an increase of 5.1 percent (a decrease of 19 percent since May 2013).

In Portage the unemployment rate in May rose slightly to 7.9 percent, from 7.8 percent in April (8.7 percent in May 2013). A total of 1,474 people was looking for work in May, an increase of 3.7 percent over April (a decrease of 6.6 percent since May 2013).

Unemployment rates elsewhere in May:

* In Gary the unemployment rate rose to 10.6 percent, from 10.5 percent in April (13.3 percent in May 2013).

* In East Chicago the unemployment rate increased to 10.9 percent, from 10.8 percent in April (11.3 percent in May 2013).

* In Hammond the unemployment rate rose to 8.0 percent, from 7.8 percent (9.6 percent in May 2013).

* In Michigan City the unemployment rate fell by more than half a point, to 10.1 percent from 10.8 percent (11.0 percent in May 2013).

DWD data for LaPorte continue to appear corrupt.

Alternative Measures

The official national unemployment rate in May was stable at 6.3 percent, the same as in May (7.3 percent in May 2013).

However--according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics--if “discouraged workers,” all other “marginally attached workers,” and “total unemployed part-time for economic reasons” are included in the tally, the unofficial unemployment rate in May was 12.2 percent, down from 12.2 percent in April (13.4 percent in May 2013).

“Marginally attached workers” are those “who indicate that they want a job, have looked for work in the last 12 months (or since the last time they worked, if they worked in the last 12 months), and are available for work.”

“Discouraged workers” are not currently looking for work for several reasons, including their belief that no job is available to them in their line or in their area.

Persons employed part-time for economic reasons” are those “who want and are available for work but have had to settle for a part-time schedule.”

 

 

Posted 6/20/2014